adplus-dvertising
World

What can you dress up as on Halloween? Nothing, it’s offensive and shame on you for asking

“A lot of historical figures are linked to problematic words or actions, and should not be impersonated.”

What can you dress up as on Halloween? Nothing, it’s offensive and shame on you for asking.

Is it OK for white kids to dress up like ‘Encanto’ characters? Experts discuss cultural appropriation – Today Show

Is it okay for Asian kids to dress up like ‘Encanto’ characters?

Examples of cultural appropriation: kids’ Halloween costumes that are described as “Mexican” (or “Cinco de Mayo”) that come with sombreros and ponchos, “Arab” with keffiyehs and robes or “Native American Princess” with feathered headdresses.

One question Varner suggests you ask your child: “How do the power of stereotypes play into your costume?”

That may sounds a little heavy for a Halloween discussion, but Varner says kids as young as 5 are totally capable of having this conversation.

Yes, you should ask 5-year-olds about cultural appropriation and then ask them which gender they are.

The Independent offers a list “10 problematic Halloween costumes you shouldn’t wear this year” including…

The Will Smith/Chris Rock Oscars slap

Please don’t go to any Halloween parties as anything related to the infamous Oscars slap. Hasn’t there been enough discourse already? Don’t be the one to reignite the debate, especially if you are a white person.

Especially if you’re a white person.

It’s easy for anyone to put on a mask, purchase a fake syringe or medical gloves and call themselves “Monkeypox” for Halloween. But doing so would make light of the monkeypox virus, of which there have been nearly 57,000 confirmed cases across the world in 2022 so far.

Also, fat suits are a hate crime.

Body-shaming is never okay, especially when it’s a Halloween costume. Not only does wearing a fat suit for Halloween display a total lack of creativity, it shows that you believe being plus-size is a joke. It’s not. Plus-size people can’t dress up as a “thin person” for Halloween, so recognise your thin privilege.

Vogue warns against homeless costumes.

Dressing up as a homeless person is never OK: There is no fun in having no work, no food, or a warm home to go to. So think twice before you decide to dress up as someone who is living on the streets or in refugee camps to a party. These people are more than often in dangerous conditions with complex or traumatic backstories

Or prison outfits.

Dressing up as a criminal is inherently a ‘no-go’, as it can make a mockery of many wrongly imprisoned people, or general prison rehabilitation efforts. Try to stay away from those bright oranges and stripes hanging in your closet.

Or historical figures.

Do your research: A lot of historical figures are linked to problematic words or actions, and should not be impersonated as a party novelty.

And finally,

If you’re reading this and thinking, “Then what can I dress as?”: you’re part of the problem.

Back to top button