adplus-dvertising
Business News

Court convicts Labour Party’s Doyin Okupe, gets 2-year jail term for money laundering

A Federal High Court sitting in Abuja has convicted the Director-general of the Labour Party’s Presidential Campaign Council, Doyin Okupe, for violating the Money Laundering Act.

Okupe was found guilty of receiving the sum of N240 million from the former National Security Adviser (NSA), Col. Sambo Dasuki. 

Okupe was sentenced on Monday by Justice Ijeoma Ojukwu to two years imprisonment in the case filed by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), who stated that the accused breached the Money Laundering Act. 

Court gives the option of fine

Justuce Ijeoma Ojukwu, stated Okupe was guilty in 26 out of the 59 counts against him by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) in the money laundering offense, citing that the 26 counts, attracted a two-year jail term each and would run concurrently. 

News continues after this ad




Okupe was given an option of N500, 000 in each of the counts, amounting to N13 million, which must be paid before 4:30 pm Monday. 

Okupe was found guilty of contravening Sections 16(1)&(2) of the Money Laundering Act, for accepting cash payments without going through a financial institution, in excess of the threshold allowed under the Act. 

News continues after this ad


EFCC accused Okupe of receiving N240 million in cash from the office of the former National Security Adviser (NSA), Col. Sambo Dasuki. 

 

In case you missed it 

Recall Nairametrics revealed earlier this year that the EFCC re-arraigned former National Security Adviser, Sambo Dasuki; former finance minister, Bashir Yuguda and three others on 25 counts bordering on misappropriation and receiving fraudulent proceeds to the tune of N23.3 billion. 

The defendants were first arraigned in 2015 before Justice Peter Affen who is now a Justice at the appellate court. 

They were accused of diverting funds from the office of the national security adviser between 2013 and 2015 to finance election campaigns 

Back to top button