Movie Reviews

What Happened To The Blue Wizards After Lord Of The Rings

Summary

  • The Blue Wizards, Alatar and Pallando, had a mission in Middle-earth to guide Men against Sauron, but their fate is unclear.
  • Like Gandalf, Saruman, and Radagast, the Blue Wizards were part of an order called the Istari, chosen to serve as emissaries.
  • The Blue Wizards may have strayed from their original purpose to teach magic and become figureheads, possibly impacting the war against Sauron.



SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENT

Two Blue Wizards came to Middle-earth during the Second Age, but what happened to them after The Lord of the Rings, and did they succeed in their mission? Like Gandalf, Saruman, and Radagast, the Blue Wizards, who were called Alatar and Pallando, came to Middle-earth to help in the fight against Sauron. Their job was to guide the Men of the East in an uprising against Sauron and those loyal to Morgoth in the First Age, but their whole story wasn’t heavily documented. Still, Tolkien shared details about what might have happened to the Blue Wizards after The Lord of the Rings.


The Blue Wizards, Gandalf, Saruman, and Radagast were members of an order called the Istari. These were The Lord of the Rings‘ Maiar who were selected by the Valar to serve as emissaries in Middle-earth. Alatar and Pallando were sent centuries before their fellows, and their mission in the East of Middle-earth meant they weren’t a part of Frodo’s story. Gandalf himself was never entirely sure what had become of the Blue Wizards, but Tolkien provided a few possibilities in The Unfinished Tales of Numenor and Middle-earth, a posthumous collection of the author’s notes.

Related

All Wizards/Istari In Lord Of The Rings

In Lord of the Rings, and all of Tolkien lore, there were five Wizards that came from Valinor to help the peoples of Middle-Earth defeat Sauron.


Tolkien Claims The Blue Wizards Passed On Their Magic In Middle-earth

The Blue Wizards Became Teachers & Religious Figureheads

The two blue wizards walk side by side in a snowy forest in a painted illustration of The Lord of the Rings.


Like Gandalf, Saruman, and Radagast, the Blue Wizards weren’t allowed to use their power to fight Sauron themselves. They were meant to have passive roles, guiding Men who wished to fight against Morgoth’s continued legacy and strengthen their numbers. It’s unclear from Tolkien’s works whether they were successful. The author noted that the Blue Wizards opened schools for magic and became the figureheads for cults. However, another note mentioning the Blue Wizards stated that they truly had made a difference in the war against Sauron.

Tolkien approached his Middle-earth works like found histories. Many of his notes in
The Unfinished Tales of Numenor and Middle-earth
contradict themselves, with different versions of the same story recorded, just as in real-world history.

The Blue Wizards Didn’t Stay True To Their Original Purpose

Gandalf Was The Only Istari Who Never Strayed From His Mission In The Lord Of The Rings

The Stranger Gandalf Radagast Wizards Istari


Regardless of whether Alatar and Pallando made a difference in the war against Sauron, it’s clear in The Lord of the Rings that they strayed from their mission. Tolkien repeated several times throughout his works that, of the five Istari, Gandalf was the only one who continued down his intended path without faltering. He sacrificed his life, returned from the dead, and continued to inspire the beings of Middle-earth to keep fighting. Saruman, of course, turned to evil, while Radagast busied himself with plants and animals and ignored his mission. The Blue Wizards, however, are more complicated.

The Blue Wizards likely had good intentions when they began teaching the Easterlings magic, but this would have violated their orders from the Valar.


The Blue Wizards likely had good intentions when they began teaching the Easterlings magic, but this would have violated their orders from the Valar. The consequence might have been that these Men began to revere them as gods, and Alatar and Pallando’s paths only got more off track from there. Of course, the Easterlings being too busy worshiping the Blue Wizards might have meant they were unwilling to march West toward Gondor. In this way, their efforts made a difference, but the Blue Wizards of The Lord of the Rings would have still been lost.

Back to top button